Meds, the Mini-Musical Diary: Entry 1

The premiere of “Meds, the Mini-Musical,” my first stage musical, will be at the end of this month. As the title suggests, it’s a very modest effort. There are only two songs, and neither is longer than a minute-and-a-half. The entire thing will run about 10 minutes. It’s one of a series of six, original short plays being produced as a fundraiser for a local hospice organization.

tophatThe same organization did the same sort of show last year, and I wrote a play for that, too. That one was set in a bus station. This year, I wrote the prequel. It’s also set in a bus station.

I hate bus stations. So why do I write plays about them? Because I hate them.

The one I wrote last year isn’t a musical, though, and adding music has been an interesting twist on the process of writing a play and watching it go into production. Despite how short the two songs are, I had to teach myself how to use a sheet music writing program. At a table reading, where the actors and director sit and read the lines, the male lead sang his solo to piano accompaniment coming from my laptop. He graduated with a degree in Music. He made my song sound good.

The story is this: 24-year-old Vincent and his mother are waiting for a bus. We learn that the pair are traveling to a clinic where a drug trial is being conducted. Vincent, you see, suffers from debilitating trances during which he believes himself to be in musicals. Hallusicals, he calls them. These episodes prevent him from holding a job or moving out of his mother’s apartment. In addition, when he goes into a trance, he stares — sometimes, at attractive women.

These hallusicals are far more interesting than real life, so Vincent hasn’t been taking the meds given to him for the drug trial. Mom’s not happy about this. Neither is the attractive stranger at whom Victor starts staring . . . and with whom he starts singing a duet. (The audience is allowed access to his hallusicals.) In the end, the woman being stared at by Vincent makes it clear he’d better snap out of it. Sensing he’s losing all grasp of reality, he decides that it’s time for him to start taking his meds. Vincent “turns a corner” in life — in keeping with the theme for all of the six plays: “Just Around the Corner.”

There’s a good chance I’ll write another diary entry or two — or three — about this experience. It’s nice to put the occult detectives to the side for a while, but I’m sure they’ll get restless, and I’ll resume checking their credentials in regard to my Bibliography.

In the meantime, there’s a taste of the mini-musical’s two tunes at the very top of my Snazzy Musical Downloads page.

About these ads

About Tim Prasil

A writer who specializes in speculative fiction, audio and stage drama, and a bit of humor. My current project is Help for the Haunted: 13 Vera Van Slyke Ghostly Mysteries. Vera is a ghost hunter who lives in the early 1900s. To read about one of her investigations, visit the Snazzy Downloads page of my Tim Prasil: Inventor of Persons blog at timprasil.wordpress.com. While you're there, enjoy my Finbar Every Friday series of quips.
This entry was posted in My Audio & Stage Plays and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Meds, the Mini-Musical Diary: Entry 1

  1. Used to be a composition major a long time ago. Is Finale the program you’re using now? Years ago I was a pro and could work that program in my sleep. Don’t use it much anymore.

    • Tim Prasil says:

      I made the original midi files on Anvil Studio, which I can’t really recommend — but I’m used to it, and it gets the job done. And it’s free.

      For the sheet music, I used a piece of freeware called MuseScore. It’s pretty easy to learn, but I’m still getting used to it. I might be converting to this from Anvil Studio for composing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s